There might be at least one organ in your body for which you might feel that it is useless or very rarely used.

Here are our picks for the 10 organs that you can live without.

lungs

10Lung

You might be a little short of breathe, but living with one lung is perfectly possible. In 1931, Rudolph Nissen, who operated in Albert Einstein, was the first surgeon to successfully remove a patient’s lung.

kidney

9Kidney

If illness, injury or poison prevents your kidneys from filtering your blood, they need to removed. You can cope quiet well with just one, but if you loose both, you will need to use a dialysis machine.

stomach

8Stomach

A gastrecomy – surgery to remove your stomach – can be required to treat cancer or ulcers. A total gastrectomy results in your oesophagus being connected directly to your intestine, which will have a long term effect on diet and digestion.

gallbladder

7Gallbladder

Sitting just below your liver, the gallbladder stores bile to break down fat in food. Gallstones caused by high cholesterol can require removal of the gallbladder.

intestine

6Intestines

There are about 7.5m of small and large intestine wrapped up in your abdomen and, if necessary, all of it can come out – though absorbing nutrients may well prove to be problematic.

eye

5Eyes

Life can be harder without sight – or eyes – but clearly many people live fulfilling their lives without the gift of vision.

4Testicle

Reproductive organs are sometimes removed for medical reasons, typically cancer.

appendix

3Appendix

Is it a vestigial organ or part of our immune system? The medical jury is stil out on that question, but it’s clear that its removal doesn’t cause any problems.

spleen

2Spleen

Your spleen sits just above your stomach in the left hand part of your body; it cleans your blood an fights infection. But if illness or injury necessitates its removal, other organs can compensate for its loss.

pancreas

1Pancreas

This small organ sits just below the stomach, and secretes hormones and digestive enzymes. In some cases of pancreatic cancer the entire organ can be removed, though the patient will require replacement hormones.

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.